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Thursday, July 23, 2020 | History

2 edition of role of external shocks in the Chilean recession 1981-1982 found in the catalog.

role of external shocks in the Chilean recession 1981-1982

Larry A. Sjaastad

role of external shocks in the Chilean recession 1981-1982

by Larry A. Sjaastad

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  • 24 Currently reading

Published by Centro de Estudios Públicos in Santiago, Chile .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Chile,
  • Chile.
    • Subjects:
    • Foreign exchange -- Chile.,
    • Recessions -- Chile.,
    • Chile -- Economic policy.

    • Edition Notes

      StatementLarry A. Sjaastad.
      SeriesDocumento de trabajo ;, no. 5, Documento de trabajo (Centro de Estudios Públicos (Santiago, Chile)) ;, no. 5.
      ContributionsCentro de Estudios Públicos (Santiago, Chile)
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHC191 .D622 no. 5, HC192 .D622 no. 5
      The Physical Object
      Pagination35 p. ;
      Number of Pages35
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL2896479M
      LC Control Number84123652

      Unemployment remained relatively elevated in between recessions. The recession began as the Federal Reserve, under Paul Volcker, raised interest rates dramatically to fight the inflation of the s. The early s are sometimes referred to as a "double-dip" or "W-shaped" recession. – recession: July –Nov 1 year. The external factors are dealt with in the context of oil shocks, world recession, growing protectionism, rising interest rates and decline of international commodity prices. The book provides a comprehensive account of how the debt crisis came about and considers its consequences for the future development of Latin America and its relations.

      This book would not have been possible without the support and encourage-ment of Leslie Lipschitz, director of the IMF Institute and Mohammed Laksaci, Governor of the Bank of Algeria. We are grateful to Joanne Blake of the IMF’s External Relations Department for coordinating the production of the book. A shock external to the economy. 1. monetary policy (to reduce inflation) 2. oil shock (big price increase) 3. fiscal (to quickly balance the budget) 4. financial (lending falls) Monetary policy & oil shocks are the most common in the postwar era.

      The term "recession" describes a situation where: inflation rates exceed normal levels. output and living standards decline. an economy's ability to produce is destroyed. government takes a less active role in economic matters. Monetarist shock therapy and "seven modernizations" (–82) Chilean (orange) and average Latin American (blue) rates of growth of GDP (–). After the military took over the government in , a period of dramatic economic changes began.


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Role of external shocks in the Chilean recession 1981-1982 by Larry A. Sjaastad Download PDF EPUB FB2

Recession of GDP and investment fall. Depression of GDP drops by percent, investment declines by 25 percent and unemployment rises to near 20 percent.

Financial crises and the depression of GDP falls by percent, investment collapses by 35 percent and unemployment rises to over 25 percent. The Transmission of External Shocks to Latin America Debt, Depression and Real Rates of Interest in Latin America Lessons of the Past: The Role of External Shocks in Chilean Recessions, The Transmission of Terms-of-Trade Shocks Fiscal Constraints and the Adjustment Process Fiscal Lags and the Problem of Stabilization: Argentina's Austral Plan.

THE ROLE OF INTERNAL AND EXTERNAL SHOCKS IN MACROECONOMIC FLUCTUATIONS OF DEVELOPING COUNTRIES. Article (PDF Available) recession in U.S economy [6]. However, f. policy and external variables.

In essence, this is an application to Chile of earlier work on external shocks and fiscal and monetary policy in representative open economies (Schmidt-Hebbel and Serven, a,b,). To our knowledge this is the first attempt at. Nascimento, Jean-Claude,The choice of an optimum exchange currency regime for a developing country: The case of the West African Monetary Union, Ph.D.

thesis (State University of New York, Albany, NY) Dec. Sjaastad, Larry,The role of external shocks m the Chilean recessionWorking paper (Department of Economics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL).Cited by: 3.

explains a bit more than a third of the fall in activity, whereas the external flnancial shock explains another third. No major role played autonomous shocks to demand or productivity shocks. We perform some robustness checks to our results. First, we allowed the flnancial shocks (domestic and external) to be governed by a transitory process and by a persistent process.

This. THE ROLE OF EXTERNAL SHOCKS 3. There is extensive literature on the role of external factors in economic development.

These range from the work on terms of trade by Ricardo to more recent work by Lewis (), Prebisch () and Singer (). Broadly speaking these authors argued that over the long run the tendency is.

relationships between external shocks, economic policies and performance across a sample of developing countries, as background to the World Development Report Initially, it was proposed to attempt to confront comparably modeled economies with similar shocks or shocks characteristic of the early s.

But such a data- and model-intensive. With traditional domestic imbalances long under control, the Chilean business cycle is driven by external shocks. Most importantly, Chile's external vulnerability is primarily a financial problem.

Box Macroeconomic adjustment, household responses, and the role of women: the experience of an urban community in Ecuador Studies of the impact of economywide events on households are surprisingly rare.

One such study was based on fieldwork in a low-income section of Guaya-quil, Ecuador's largest city, between and No study to date has conducted a comprehensive evaluation of the role of external shocks and constraints for the entire period since the initial opening of the Mexican economy in the late s, and how the effects of external variables were either weakened or strengthened by major policy changes such as trade liberalization and the formation Cited by: the recovery of Chilean economy in mid-to-late s.

I also discuss the measures taken in Chile since the crisis in order to assess the possibility of a reoccurrence another severe economic crisis in Chile 's future. Prelude to the Crisis: "The Crisis Was Not Supposed to Happen in Chile Author: Michael Margitich.

global financial crisis on the Chilean economy with a DSGE model that incorporated financial restrictions (domestic spread and country risk premium shocks). The authors found that foreign shocks –the spread differential, the country risk premium and foreign output shocks– played a major role in the downturn experienced by Chile in and.

"Policy Responses to External Shocks: The Experiences of Australia, Brazil, and Chile," Central Banking, Analysis, and Economic Policies Book Series, in: Ricardo Caballero & César Calderón & Luis Felipe Céspedes & Norman Loayza (Series Editor) & Klaus Sc (ed.), External Vulnerability and Preventive Policies, edition 1, vol chapter 5.

The second external shock examined is Japan’s recent recession, the most severe and prolonged down-turn that country has had since World War II. By cutting Japan’s imports from its East Asian neighbors, Japan’s recession has contributed to their economic problems, but the timing of the Japanese recession, which began in.

the shocks, and 2) the estimated degrees of freedom are quite low for several shocks that drive U.S. business cycles, implying an important role for rare large shocks. This result holds even if we exclude the Great Recession period from the sample.

We also show that inference about low-frequency changes in volatility | and in particular, inference. "external€shocks" 1.€The size€of€the€shocke.g.€the€scale€of€a€rise€in€oil€prices€in€real€terms duration€of€a€shock–€is€a€big€price€movement€temporary€or€longer€lasting.

3.€How€widespread€is€the€shock€onkey€industriesin€an€economy. ISBN: OCLC Number: Description: xxii, pages: illustrations ; 25 cm: Contents: Debt, depression, and real rates of interest in Latin America / Larry A.

Sjaastad --Lessons of the past: the role of external shocks in Chilean recessions, / Hernán Cortés Douglas --The transmission of terms-of-trade shocks / Philip L. Brock --Fiscal lags and the.

external shocks and fluctuations in the availability of international capital. There are a series of additional characteristics of Chile’s international borrowing that are worth examining.

One of these is the secondary role played by the banking sector in intermediating foreign credit. In contrast other countries with similar levels of economicCited by: 1 This paper is written for a forthcoming book, Financial Crises: Causes, Consequences, and Policy Responses, edited by Stijn Claessens, M.

Ayhan Kose, Luc Laeven, and Fabián Valencia, to be published by the International Monetary Fund. We thank Ezgi. during the Great Recession were due to financial frictions interacting with the zero lower bound.

For a related view also see Del Negro, Giannoni and Schorfheide (). How important the role of oil price shocks is in explaining recessions appears to depend largely on how their relationship with U.S. real GDP growth is Size: KB. From the mids to the Asian crisis inthe Chilean economy grew at an average annual rate of per­cent, followed by an average annual rate of per­cent between and Recession and, in these models, increased financial frictions on firms are not a big enough trigger to reduce consumption significantly.

The bottom line is that the effects of financial shocks on the production side of the economy are only a minor contributor to the Great Recession.